Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for the Rapid Diagnosis of Intussusception: A Case Series

Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for the Rapid Diagnosis of Intussusception: A Case Series

GHEM Executive Member, Margaret Salmon, and colleagues Stephanie Doniger and Resa Lewiss publish: Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for the Rapid Diagnosis of Intussusception: A Case Series Abstract: We present a case series describing an infant and a child who presented with abdominal discomfort and their conditions were diagnosed with intussusception by point-of-care ultrasound. These cases illustrate how point-of-care ultrasound led to the expeditious diagnosis of intussusception. Citation:Marin JR, Doniger SJ, Salmon M, Lewiss RE. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for the Rapid Diagnosis of Intussusception: A Case Series. Pediatric Emergency Care. 2016 Feb...
Hunchak et al, publish early mortality results from TASH-ED in BMC Research Notes

Hunchak et al, publish early mortality results from TASH-ED in BMC Research Notes

Patterns and predictors of early mortality among emergency department patients in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, has published in BMC Research Notes, an online, open-access journal on October 24, 2015 Authors Cheryl Hunchak, Sisay Teklu, Nazanin Meshkat, Christopher Meaney and Lisa Puchalski Ritchie. Background: Ethiopian emergency department (ED) patients have a considerable burden of illness and injury for which all-cause mortality rates have not previously been published. This study sought to characterize the burden of and to identify predictors for early all-cause mortality among patients presenting to the Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital ED (TASH-ED) in Ethiopia. Methods: Data was prospectively collected from the records of all patients who died within 72 h of ED presentation. Pearson’s Chi square and Fisher’s exact tests were used to investigate associations between two outcome variables: (a) time to death and (b) immediate cause of death in relation to specific demographic and clinical factors. Time from ED presentation to death was dichotomized as ‘very early’ mortality within ≤6 h and death >6–72 h and logistic regression was used to assess the adjusted impact of these demographic and clinical variables on the probability of dying within 6 h of ED presentation. Results: Between October 2012 and May 2013, 9956 patients visited the ED and 220 patients died within 72 h of admission. After excluding patients dead on arrival (n = 34), the average age of death was 43.1 years and the overall mortality rate was 1.9 %. Head injury (21.5 %) and sepsis (18.8 %) were the most common causes of death. Relative to medical patients, trauma patients were more likely to be male (p < 0.01), less likely to have...
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action 2015

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action 2015

On June 2, 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada released a summary of its examination of the impact of Indian Residential Schools. From establishment of the residential schools program in the late 1800s to its end in 1996, over 150,000 First Nations, Metis, and Inuit children were separated from their families and placed in government funded schools. While acknowledging that some students had positive experiences, the report asserts that the program was part of a “cultural genocide” designed to “eliminate Aboriginal people as distinct peoples and to assimilate them into the Canadian mainstream against their will.” Collecting thousands of testimonials and statements over 6 years, this report documents experiences of former students, families, communities, and others involved with the residential school system. The document was designed to serve as a “permanent record of the Indian residential school legacy,” or what commission chair Justice Murray Sinclair, called “a reference document… for generations to come.” In addition the report makes 94 recommendations that aim to correct past injustices and build a framework for “establishing and maintaining a mutually respectful relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples.” The recommendations include: – Full adoption and implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples – Reform and reinforcement of child welfare, education, justice, and health care systems – Recognition of Aboriginal language rights and promotion of Aboriginal languages The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada report can be found at www.trc.ca. PHOTO – Commission chairman Justice Murray Sinclair speaks at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Ottawa on Tuesday, June 2, 2015 in Ottawa. (Credit: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian...
Nazanin Meshkat publishes survey results in CJEM

Nazanin Meshkat publishes survey results in CJEM

FOR RELEASE: Knowledge gaps in the diagnosis & management of patients with tropical diseases presenting to Canadian emergency departments  Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (www.caep.ca) November 10, 2014 Travelers returning to Canada from exotic locations may return with more than memories. Imported diseases, including malaria, dengue, and Ebola, can be acquired abroad and brought back to Canada in unsuspecting individuals. Often, the first point of contact for these patients are the emergency physicians across our country. Dr. Nazanin Meshkat (from the University of Toronto) and colleagues published a study looking at Canadian emergency physicians’ management of tropical diseases in the November 2014 issue of the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine (http://cjem-online.ca/v16/n6/p458). In the study, they surveyed Canadian emergency physicians about tropical disease training and conducted case studies to assess knowledge about the identification and management of specific tropical diseases. Although the survey was directed at experienced emergency physicians, most had minimal or no specific training in tropical diseases. Overall, emergency physicians indicated an unacceptably low level of comfort when faced with patients with tropical disease symptoms. From the tropical disease case studies, 40% of the cases were incorrectly diagnosed or managed. Although concerning, it is substantially better than a similar 2006 study of UK physicians where 78% were incorrectly diagnosed (doi: 10.1111/j.1708-8305.2006.00019.x). In Dr. Meshkat’s study, the Canadian emergency physicians were aware of the knowledge gap, and the desire for more training was high. Those in the study indicated that conference workshops, case studies, and podcasts would all be good continuing medical education opportunities to improve their knowledge about the diagnosis and management of tropical disease. The authors investigated...
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