Scholarships for Graduate Study in London, England

Scholarships for Graduate Study in London, England

The London Goodenough Association of Canada (“LGAC”) invites applications for Scholarships in support of graduate study in London, England for the 2015-16 academic year. The LGAC awards Scholarships towards the cost of accommodation at Goodenough College, the pre-eminent residential college for international graduate students in London. Superbly located in central London, the College attracts members from over 80 countries, creating a rich cultural and academically diverse residential community. Goodenough College is comprised of two main residential halls: London House, which re-opened in September, 2014 after an extensive renovation, and William Goodenough House which was fully renovated in 2011-12. In the 2014 U.K. National Student Survey, Goodenough College was voted the Best Learning Environment and received the International Accommodation Quality Mark. The LGAC is an association of over 1,800 Canadians who have lived in the College’s residences. Since 1990, it has awarded 162 funded Scholarships with a value of over $1 million. In addition to Scholarship funding, winners receive guaranteed acceptance for residence at the College – a highly sought benefit. For 2015-16, the LGAC plans to award six or more Scholarships with a value up to £5,000 each, including awards funded by individual donors, corporate sponsors and foundations, such as the Molson Foundation, sponsor of the Molson Foundation Scholarship for Francophone Canadians. Scholarships are awarded principally on the basis of academic excellence, and take into account the expected contribution that winners will make to the extracurricular life at Goodenough College. Candidates must be full-time students enrolling in an accredited graduate (or higher) program in London, or undertaking thesis research in London while enrolled elsewhere. Scholarship winners are required to...
Nazanin Meshkat publishes survey results in CJEM

Nazanin Meshkat publishes survey results in CJEM

FOR RELEASE: Knowledge gaps in the diagnosis & management of patients with tropical diseases presenting to Canadian emergency departments  Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (www.caep.ca) November 10, 2014 Travelers returning to Canada from exotic locations may return with more than memories. Imported diseases, including malaria, dengue, and Ebola, can be acquired abroad and brought back to Canada in unsuspecting individuals. Often, the first point of contact for these patients are the emergency physicians across our country. Dr. Nazanin Meshkat (from the University of Toronto) and colleagues published a study looking at Canadian emergency physicians’ management of tropical diseases in the November 2014 issue of the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine (http://cjem-online.ca/v16/n6/p458). In the study, they surveyed Canadian emergency physicians about tropical disease training and conducted case studies to assess knowledge about the identification and management of specific tropical diseases. Although the survey was directed at experienced emergency physicians, most had minimal or no specific training in tropical diseases. Overall, emergency physicians indicated an unacceptably low level of comfort when faced with patients with tropical disease symptoms. From the tropical disease case studies, 40% of the cases were incorrectly diagnosed or managed. Although concerning, it is substantially better than a similar 2006 study of UK physicians where 78% were incorrectly diagnosed (doi: 10.1111/j.1708-8305.2006.00019.x). In Dr. Meshkat’s study, the Canadian emergency physicians were aware of the knowledge gap, and the desire for more training was high. Those in the study indicated that conference workshops, case studies, and podcasts would all be good continuing medical education opportunities to improve their knowledge about the diagnosis and management of tropical disease. The authors investigated...
MSF Walk Without Borders top fundraisers: Raghu & Desmond

MSF Walk Without Borders top fundraisers: Raghu & Desmond

Congratulations to GHEM General Member Raghu Venugopal and his son Desmond for being the top fundraisers for MSF’s Walk Without Borders Challenge! Raghu and Des raised $20,000 to support the lifesaving humanitarian medical aid MSF provides to people in need around the...
Black Lion Hospital’s Emergency Department Head Visits Toronto

Black Lion Hospital’s Emergency Department Head Visits Toronto

Dr. Aklilu Azazh, Head of the Emergency Department at Black Lion Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, visited Toronto and Ottawa from May 27 until June 5, 2014. This IDRC-sponsored research trip allowed Dr. Aklilu to attend TAAAC-EM related research meetings and meet with important stakeholders for the project. He also attended the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Conference in Ottawa, where 4 TAAAC-EM related posters were presented. During the Toronto portion of his trip, TAAAC-EM hosted a Spring Social event where Dr. Aklilu was presented with a Certificate of Appreciation by the Vice-Minister of Health of Ethiopia for “his dedication and commitment to collaboration and excellence as a key team member of the Toronto Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration in Emergency Medicine (TAAAC-EM) over the past five years.” Congratulations to Dr. Aklilu! Pictured: Dr. Anil Chopra, Chief, Emergency Medicine, University Health Network Dr. Aklilu Azazh, Head, Department of Emergency Medicine, Black Lion Hospital Dr. Fasika Aklilu, past TAAAC-EM delegate Dr. Wendy Lai, past TAAAC-EM delegate & Dr. Megan Landes, TAAAC-EM...
Graduation speech to Ethiopia’s first Emergency Doctors

Graduation speech to Ethiopia’s first Emergency Doctors

Dr. James Maskalyk gave the following speech to the first graduates of TAAAC-EM’s program: Biruk, Sofia, Yenalem, Seble….. You did it. I feel like there should be 84 million, nine hundred ninety-nine thousand, nine hundred and sixty more people in this room.  In fact, I feel like the whole world should be here, not just to celebrate your graduation as an occasion that marks a safer future for the most vulnerable, or that the means by which you were trained is replicable and available, but to see how people from three different countries can come together in a spirit of peace and make something beautiful. I came to Addis, for my first time, not from a place of peace, but from one at war. Sudan.  It suffers still. I was working for MSF in a small hospital, overwhelmed by the sick and dying and fighting, the heat and the sand, and when a chance came for me to leave that place, to come to Ethiopia and learn how to care for patients with Tuberculosis, I took it, not just to help them get their breath back, but to find mine again, even if just for a week. The air that I stepped into, at Bole’s international airport, smelled so sweet.  It still does. A professor from Addis Ababa University taught me everything I know about TB, with his x-rays and experience, saved dozens of peoples lives, through me.  Because of him, because of Ethiopia, in Addis Ababa in 2007, I touched hope when it seemed far away, and it carried me through my mission, and it has carried me...
Dr. Venugopal blogs from Chad

Dr. Venugopal blogs from Chad

The MSF mission to Chad has been in operation for 31 years. Its focus has been to serve the most vulnerable and as well to respond to health impact of violence, displacement and food insecurity. MSF currently has 3 operating sections in Chad. Raghu will be working in Amtiman, Chad, in the southeast, near the Sudan and Central African Republic border. The focus of this intervention is primary care in outpatient clinics in the community, HIV, TB, sexual violence, pediatrics, malnutrition, obstetrics and female genital mutilation. Raghu will be the Medical Team Leader, supporting all medical team members in their role, assisting with complex medical cases as well as coordinating the team and ensuring it meets the ongoing needs of the population. Follow his journey at:...
Page 3 of 41234